35th Blues Music Award Nominees Announced

Fromt he Blues Foundation Website (https://www.blues.org/#ref=index)
The Blues Foundation is pleased to announce the nominations for the annual Blues Music Awards, which will be presented at the Cook Convention Center in downtown Memphis, Tennessee on Thursday, May 8, 2014. The Blues Music Awards are universally recognized as the highest accolade afforded musicians and songwriters in Blues music. The annual Blues Music Awards ceremony is the premier event for Blues professionals, musicians, and fans from all over the world. The focus of this celebration is to recognize superior achievements in Blues performance, songwriting, and recording while honoring a rich cultural tradition. 
Leading the list of nominees for the 35th Blues Music Awards with five nominations are Lurrie Bell, James Cotton and Charlie MusselwhiteBuddy Guy received four. Rick Estrin, Doug MacLeod and Bobby Rush each garnered three nominations. Both of Charlie Musselwhite’s releases Get Up! with Ben Harper and Remembering Little Walter with a quintet of harpists were nominated (as they were for the Grammys®). It was good year for members of the Blues Hall of Fame as Cotton, Guy, Musselwhite, Rush and Billy Boy Arnold are all enshrined but still artistically relevant.The complete list of 35th Blues Music Award nominees follows.Tickets for the Award show go on sale December 16. Blues Foundation members are the only fans who vote to decide which nominees will actually take home the Blues Music Award. Of course, anyone can become a member!

Every year, the Blues Music Awards ceremony itself proves to be one of the best shows of the year. After all, almost every nominee not only attends, but also performs – creating a lineup comprised of the best of the best in blues all in one evening.

Major funding is provided by ArtsMemphis and the Tennessee Arts Commission. The 34rd Blues Music Awards are also sponsored by BMI, Catfood Records, Eagle Rock Entertainment, FedEx, First Tennessee Foundation, Legendary Rhythm & Blues Cruise, Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau, Sierra Nevada Brewing Company and Sony/Legacy.

35th Blues Music Award Nominees

Acoustic Album
There’s a Time – Doug MacLeod
Juba dance – Guy Davis featuring Fabrizio Poggi
Soulscape – Harrison Kennedy
Avalon – Rory Block
Unleashed – The Hound Kings

Acoustic Artist
Doug MacLeod
Guy Davis
Harrison Kennedy
Little G Weevil
Rory Block

Album
Get Up! – Ben Harper with Charlie Musselwhite
Remembering Little Walter – Billy Boy Arnold, Charlie Musselwhite, Mark Hummel, Sugar Ray Norcia & James Harman
Rhythm & Blues – Buddy Guy
Cotton Mouth Man – James Cotton
Blues in My Soul – Lurrie Bell

B.B. King Entertainer
Bobby Rush
Buddy Guy
John Németh
Kim Wilson
Rick Estrin

Band
Lil Ed & the Blues Imperials
Rick Estrin & the Night Cats
Tedeschi Trucks Band
The Mannish Boys
Trampled Under Foot

Best New Artist Debut
Double Crossing Blues – Adrianna Marie and Her Groovecutters
Rooster – Clay Swafford
Proof of Love – Gracie Curran & the High Falutin’ Band
What’s the Chance… – Paul Gabriel
Daddy Told Me – Shawn Holt & the Teardrops
Pushin’ Against a Stone – Valerie June

Contemporary Blues Album
Get Up! – Ben Harper with Charlie Musselwhite
This Time Another Year – Brandon Santini
Rhythm & Blues – Buddy Guy
Magic Honey – Cyril Neville
Badlands – Trampled Under Foot

Contemporary Blues Female Artist
Ana Popovic
Beth Hart
Bettye LaVette
Candye Kane
Susan Tedeschi

Contemporary Blues Male Artist
Buddy Guy
Gary Clark, Jr.
Johnny Sansone
Kim Wilson
Otis Taylor

DVD
High John Records – Time Brings About a Change (Floyd Dixon)
J&R Adventures – An Acoustic Evening at the Vienna Opera House (Joe Bonamassa)
Shake-It-Sugar Records – Live (Murali Coryell)
Ruf Records – Songs from the Road (Royal Southern Brotherhood)
Blue Star Connection – Live at Knuckleheads (The Healers)

Historical 
The Sun Blues Box (Various Artists) – Bear Family
The Original Honeydripper (Roosevelt Sykes) – Blind Pig Records
The Jewel/Paula Blues Story (Various Artists) – Fuel Records
Death Might Be Your Santa Claus (Various Artists) – Legacy Recordings
The Complete King/Federal Singles (Freddie King) – Real Gone Music

Instrumentalist-Bass
Bill Stuve
Bob Stroger
Danielle Schnebelen
Larry Taylor
Patrick Rynn

Instrumentalist-Drums
Cedric Burnside
Jimi Bott
Kenny Smith
Tom Hambridge
Tony Braunagel

Instrumentalist-Guitar
Anson Funderburgh
Gary Clark, Jr.
Kid Andersen
Lurrie Bell
Ronnie Earl

Instrumentalist-Harmonica
Brandon Santini
Charlie Musselwhite
James Cotton
Kim Wilson
Rick Estrin

Instrumentalist-Horn
Big James Montgomery
Eddie Shaw
Jimmy Carpenter
Sax Gordon
Terry Hanck

Koko Taylor Award (Traditional Blues Female)
Diunna Greenleaf
Lavelle White
Teeny Tucker
Trudy Lynn
Zora Young

Rock Blues Album
Gone to Texas – Mike Zito & the Wheel
Made Up Mind – Tedeschi Trucks Band
Can’t Get Enough – The Rides
John the Conquer Root – Toronzo Cannon
Luther’s Blues – Walter Trout

Pinetop Perkins Piano Player
Barrellhouse Chuck
Dave Keyes
Marcia Ball
Mike Finnigan
Victor Wainwright

Song
“Blues in My Soul” – Lurrie Bell
“He Was There” – James Cotton, Tom Hambridge & Richard Fleming
“That’s When the Blues Begins” – James Goode
“The Entitled Few” – Doug MacLeod
“The Night the Pie Factory Burned Down” – Johnny Sansone

Soul Blues Album
Down In Louisiana – Bobby Rush
Soul Changes – Dave Keller
Soul for Your Blues – Frank Bey & Anthony Paule Band
Remembering O. V. – Johnny Rawls
Truth Is (Putting Love Back Into the Music) – Otis Clay

Soul Blues Female Artist
Barbara Carr
Denise LaSalle
Dorothy Moore
Irma Thomas
Sista Monica

Soul Blues Male Artist
Bobby Rush
Frank Bey
John Nemeth
Johnny Rawls
Otis Clay

Traditional Blues Album
Driftin’ from Town to Town – Barrelhouse Chuck & Kim Wilson’s Blues All-Stars
Remembering Little Walter – Billy Boy Arnold, Charlie Musselwhite, Mark Hummel, Sugar Ray Norcia, James Harman
Cotton Mouth Man – James Cotton
Blues in My Soul – Lurrie Bell
Black Toppin’ – The Cash Box Kings

Traditional Blues Male Artist
Anson Funderburgh
Billy Boy Arnold
James Cotton
John Primer
Lurrie Bell

 

Love, Peace & Chicken Grease
chefjimi

©Blues411.com 2013
Where Blues Thrive

Assaying the Oxymoronic Nature of the Blues – Shared Knowledge and Some CD Reviews

So we all know (or maybe not) that I took some time off to chill on the hot and sunny shore of South
Carolina recently. I had planned on getting some work done, and did – but not in the ‘traditional’ sense of what I do.

Meeting new people and getting better acquainted with others led to some interesting discussions about the ‘mysterious’ Blues genre. Such things as, “it’s Jazz right”, “it’s always depressing”, “what are the real Blues”, “you should write more for the novice, so we can learn more” – - -  all these things played out before me as I tried to explain the differences, the subtleties, the glorious oxymoronic nature of it, and goodness knows what else to everyone and anyone who was interested. Yes they were interested, that’s a good thing. From seventeen year old Michael, who plays a little guitar wanting me to show him some Blues licks and patterns, to a new member of the half century club, Judy, wanting to really understand what makes the Blues the Blues and how she could learn more without feeling overwhelmed.

While there I had a good supply of CD’s that I had planned on listening to and reviewing, and was glad I did. I gave them out to these good folks – carefully selecting styles that I felt would compel them to learn more about the mother of American Roots Music. Thanks to the various publicists, record companies, Sirius/XM Bluesville 70 and all the artists who have allowed me to hear and spread the music in reviews or by word of mouth. So what I will do here is to offer up, for them and others – not a stale, word-smithing version of what the Blues are – but a sampler of music that in some respects illustrates how wide ranging and complex the genre is. These are newer releases, I chose them because of the familiar feel and production values that they contain, no need for trying to listen over scratchy vinyl.

I hope that you enjoy it and maybe pass it around and also hopefully pick up some of these discs and add
them to your collection. It is by no means being stated as a de facto standard. It is just the evolution of what went on in South Carolina and my attempt to help clarify and educate friends of all ages to the greatness that is the Blues.

K.K. Martin: Naked Blues, Vol. II (Ranell Records) www.kkmartin.com

What better way to introduce someone to the traditional aspect of the Blues than with K.K. Martin’s ‘Naked Blues Vol. II’. While there are many choices, I was looking for something that was fairly current and featured the songs of artists that may be known to the casual fan. And, oh yes, it needed to be really, really good.

Here we have a man and his guitar – that’s it, copping to the title ‘Naked Blues’ it is that personal and that private a release here.With the first cut ‘Rattlesnake Shake‘, a cover of the Peter Green tune, Mr. Martin revels the true nature of this song with some slithering slide guitar and gritty ‘c’est la vie’ vocals that reiterate the inevitable outcome of shakin’ that rattlesnake. Next up is a Rev. Gary Davis tune, ‘Slow Motion Daddy‘, done with justice featuring excellent finger picking and slide work here.

On this ten track release Mr. Martin covers both past and modern era greats. From one of the sweetest versions of Blind Lemon Jefferson’s ‘See That My Grave Is Kept Clean‘, to a dark interpretation of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’ song, ‘Alligator Wine’ which allows us to rusticate in that swampy, unctuous bayou with the moon burning bright at midnight.

Moving to a more modern master, Johnny Winter, K.K. states that Johnny is a true hero – responsible for bringing the Blues to young rockers worldwide. Mr. Martin’s cover of ‘Dallas‘ is a slide filled, grit encrusted wrangling of Mr. Winter’s musical tribute to the big D. Included also on this release are two Tom Waits tunes. Mr. Waits may not be thought of as a Blues artist, but what Mr. Martin does with these tunes leaves no doubt that with a skilled interpreter amazing results can be accomplished. While we are drawn to Mr. Martin’s guitar playing, careful listening to his voice shows a depth and sincerity that is paramount in the Blues world.

What the listener will get from this release is the authentic true feel of acoustic blues played by a man whose love of the music coupled his own superior talent and confidence shine through, and in doing so make for one compelling release that will appeal to hard core Blues fans as well as the new members of our congregation. The figure of the solitary blues artist with their guitar is almost symbolic of the genre itself. Robert Johnson, Mississippi Fred McDowell, John Lee Hooker, to more recently Rory Block, Fiona Boyes , Guy Davis and Eric Bibb, these individuals are a true link to the past.

Jackie Johnson: Memphis Jewel (Catfood Records) www.catfoodrecords.com

The eternal discussion as to the relationship between Blues music and church music is an interesting one. We have had Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Aretha Franklin (daughter of a preacher man), Reverend Gary Davis and Son House among countless others, male and female, who have straddled that fine line between Gods’ and the Devil’s music. Looking for something that would incorporate these qualities – while being familiar we find Ms. Jackie Johnson.

Opening with ‘It Should Have Been Me‘ which was originally done by Gladys Night & the Pips back in 1968, we find Ms. Johnson displaying her gospel roots and giving palpable distress to the bridesmaid’s situation as her ‘man’ weds another woman. Give her voice a listen to (ignore the groove if you can) and you will hear all the joy and grief that comes from such a situation as well as it’s roots in the cold comfort of the church where the ceremony is taking place.

Another superb cover is the Smokey Robinson & The Miracles signature piece ‘Tears of A Clown’. Featuring Ms. Reba Russell on background vocals and an enticing mix of instrumentation, they work together to help Ms. Johnson perform a musical act of eminent domain (not an uncommon occurence in music). While it might still be Smokey’s, Jackie has claimed a piece of it for her own. What follows this track is an absolute killer duet with Memphis legend Mr. Johnny Rawls. ‘Love You Still’  harkens to the days of such classic duets as Otis Redding & Carla Thomas in the hey-day of Stax Records. The pure force of these two vocalists makes you sit up and take notice on this Johnny Rawls penned song. One other familiar track is Betty Wright’s ‘Clean Up Woman’ a true Southern soul classic.

Ms. Johnson gives undeniable verity to what the human voice can do and the range of options that a quality artist possesses. With this release we can also remember that back in the day – yeh THE day – the Blues were ruled by female singers, Ida Cox, Memphis Minnie, Ma Rainey, Mamie Smith. With releases such as this one I have to attest that, to me, they still run the roost.

Lubriphonic: The Gig Is On (Lubricated World, Inc.) www.lubriphonic.com

It is said that ‘the Blues are the Roots , and everything else is just the fruits’….if this is so, then we should having no problem in accepting R&B as part of the Blues world. Rhythm & Blues incorporates Funk, Soul and whatever else industry moguls spuriously devise to keep us divided. R&B, Soul, Funk and yes, Hip-Hop are consanguine with the Blues.

Please allow me to introduce one of the funkiest, greasiest bands around currently. Lubrophonic. Based out of Chicago (the Northern home of the Blues where Muddy Waters went and turned it electric, as well as Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon to modern day apostles such as Buddy Guy, Nick Moss, Liz Mandeville, Billy Branch, and The Brooks Family all reside) this band is busy keeping the world lubricated and dancing in the aisles and living rooms across America.

With a drum roll, reminiscent of a circus intro, which turns into a spanking solo, quickly joined by such impertinent horns that we have no choice to listen up at the ‘Rhino‘ coming down the track. If you can get thru this cut without banging on the table or dancing – then as the old Blues adage goes – “Jack, you’re dead”. With trumpet, sax, trombones intermixed with keyboards, bass and filthy guitar licks and rhythms we feel much at home and in familiar company here. Sly Stone, Tower of Power and Curtis Mayfield amongst others. But they are current not regurgitated rhythms and music.

At times the vocals remind me of Anthony Kiedis from Red Hot Chili Peppers, with their rapid fire staccato delivery on such tracks as ‘Under The Line’ by band leader Giles Corey. Then they move to a hip-hop feel with lyrics that speak of hot summer nights, punks on the train, and dope men hangin’ on the streets. ‘The Getaway’  is a prime example of such vocal treatments, with piercing lyrics to add to the gritty inner-city urban feel, then they break off into an organ riff laced with acid jazz overtones which then gives way to the ghost of Terry Kath on guitar.

We hear the influences of Rock, Latin, and Soul which come together with such musical authority that it effectively proceeds to abrogate the artificial boundaries that separate the musical styles from one another. This is most apparent in the title track ‘The Gig Is On’ which starts out with a steady groove and soft wah-wah effects from the guitar and picks up force and speed much like a ride in the express track of a runaway subway train. Bolstered by two sizzling sax solos and searing guitar work it is truly a fast paced drive thru the bands world and leaves no room for the weak hearted or for fools.

This album features Ivan Neville playing organ on three cuts as well as the clavinet on one. His appearance solidifies the wide range of urban influences that paint the grooves of this release as they travel from inner cities up and down the Mississippi as the forefathers of the Blues did. We sometimes forget that music is energy and it expresses desires, deep inner feelings and a drive to transcend the current situation of the artist, whether it be in a simple song or a rave up of epic proportions they are all about life. This release captures these dynamics and lays them out for all to hear.

Lee Pons: Big Boogie Voodoo (Mind Balm Records) www.leepons.com

Can you believe that just as women once ruled the Blues scene – that the piano was king. Yeah, long before the guitar became the rattlenake that shakes the blues world the trusty 88′s were the driving force in the blues. Such luminaries as Amos Milburn, Leroy Carr, Meade ‘Lux’ Lewis up through ‘Champion’ Jack Dupree, Memphis Slim to Ray Charles, Pinetop Perkins and Otis Spann. These names resonate with the soul of the Blues – piano blues.

Lee Pons is out of Florida, but his soul is in New Orleans. He comes from a family of accomplished, even famous musicians. In the 1930′s his dad played upright bass in big bands and was in the Danny Kaye film ‘A Song Is Born’ which featured a jam session with Louis Armstrong, Lionel Hampton and Benny Goodman (that was Lee’s dad on the bass). But the bass wasn’t for Lee, he found his calling one night seeing the good Dr. John on Don Kirschner’s Rock Concert – it was all over for him.

Opening the release with ”The Voodoo Boogie‘ we jump the train down to new Orleans and never look back. Showing some serious left handed bass runs and joyous right handed fingering we are treated to a showcase of ivory and we are now, hooked. The third track is titled ‘Blues for Nawlins’ and it is a moody pace enhanced by loving lyrics for his adopted home. His vocals sit deep in the chest and rasp like the long black line still hanging over the fifth ward and other areas forgotten by America, but underneath is the undying hope that it will return to its ol’ self.

With the Professor Longhair song ‘Her Mind Is Gone’  Lee pays tribute to one of the great Nawlins pianists. A full tilt boogie woogie with a solid walking bass line and enough triplets to make even octomom happy Mr. Pons shows a deep respect and understanding of the classic music of New Orleans and ‘Fess to inspire anyone to learn more about this style.

The love song here would be ‘Me Minus You’ as Lee pines the loss of his lover and how ‘me minus you equals lonliness’. With a sideways nod to Leon Russell this track is a nice change from the up tempo collection that he offers us. Slow, heart felt and with a sincerity that might scare other men away he does a fine, fine job of relating the situation and where it stands. Not to get too hung up on ‘real feelings’ Lee proceeds to ‘Radiate the 88′s’ in true piano man boogie fashion, then hits us with an cleverly titled ‘BoogieRobics’. I can see all the ladies at Zumba class shaking their money makers to this, well actually I can see everyone dancing to this at his shows – a solid boogie which holds a mirror of reverance to Pinetop and Sunnyland Slim.

This release will open up the cupboard and allow many folks to listen forward while looking back at the piano greats that once ruled the jook joints and chicken shacks. People like Art Tatum, Jellyroll Morton, Roosevelt Sykes and even the current crop such as Dr. John, Mitch Woods, Eden Brent and Marcia Ball – all worthy torch bearers of the radiatin’ the 88′s legacy.

——-author’s note:
As I set off to accomplish this simple task of revealing used mysteries, I realized that it was taking on a life of it’s own. It already has experienced shape shifting and directional movements that I had not foreseen. That being said, I like the way it is working on the many different levels, I believe that new fans will gain insight into the disarmingly reassuring world of Blues music, and will return for more. For the experienced readers they will, no doubt, have their hackles raised by some of my choices. But since this is a ‘friendly cactus’ of sorts it is meant to start conversations, or perhaps to open eyes. It is that exact jinxed charm that flows in the blood of the Blues and sometimes makes it hard for outsiders to grasp. So with your kind allowance I will make this into a multi part blog and hope you are looking forward to part II with sulky optimism.

 

Until next time,
Love, Peace & Chicken Grease,
chefjimi
©Blues411.com 2011

photos: courtesy of artists.

The Blues: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues
Female Blues Singers: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classic_female_blues
Piano Blues: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_blues
by no means comprehensive but it’s a start, just Google Blues, The Blues or some of the names above and sit back and relax as the world opens up to ya.

CD Reviews: Old Friends, New Releases

Spring is here, at least for the moment, so it’s time to take stock and go thru closets and sort things out that matter. So what I have done for these reviews is to take some artists who, for whatever reasons, are considered ‘old friends’. I may have been listening some to them for years, or known them for a good spell of time. With that in mind, I’m reviewing their new releases and enjoy the comfort they bring, but also the excitement that they provide in their new works. I hope you too, will pick up on some of this and maybe they will become ‘new friends’ to you.

Tracy Nelson: Victim Of The Blues (Delta Groove)
http://www.tracynelson.com/
Possessing a signature voice that seems to shine with the ligfht of truth, regardless of genre or niche, Ms. Nelson is qualified as an old friend to me. From her early days in 1964 with the release of ‘Deep Are the Roots‘ and through to her forming of the band, Mother Earth, Ms. Nelson has set a standard for female vocalists that still holds sway today.

Victim of the Blues‘ opens with the Willie Dixon cut ‘You’ll Be Mine‘ a rolling piano provided by Jimmy Pugh, that is matched in it’s intensity by Mike Henderson on gutiar and we hear THAT VOICE – unmistakable, full of intent purpose as she dictates the line ‘you’ll be mine’ leaving no doubt about the outcome of this situation.

Ms. Nelson offers up interpretations of some songs fromn the ancestral tree of the Blues: Howlin’ Wolf, Jimmy Reed, Lightin’ Hopkins and Ma Rainey. But one that caught my ear is the incredible song by Mr. Earl Thomas, ‘Lead A Horse To Water‘, In her liner notes she states her love for the song when she ffirst heard and acknowledges her surprise when she learned that it was from a contemporary artist and not written back in the day. This song is a favorite of mine by Mr. Thomas, and Ms. Nelson infects it with a touch of gospel and deep rooted soul as she calls and is answered by Mr. James ‘Nick’ Nixon. Add to that some swampy slide guitars out to a first rate version of a top notch song. Thank you for singing this !

The title cut is a Ma Rainey tune, and as with every release, Ms. Neslon includes a song by Ms. Rainey or Ms. Bessie Smith, two of her earliest influences. In 2010 Ms. Nelson lost practically everything in a fire at her 100+ year old farm house near Nashville, wherein the local Fire Department said they could save just one room, she choose the studio. This album somehow survived that fire and it is aptly titled – her rendition of the tune is more of a confession and release of all that has occurred up to this point.

Ms. Nelson has some outstanding guests contained within this release. Ms. Angela Strehli offering up advice in ‘Howlin’ For My Baby’, Ms. Marcia Ball combining vocals and her unmistakable piano style on ‘Shoot My Baby’. Not to mention Ms. Reba Russell on background vocals (how good is that )? The final cut which was made famous by Ms. Irma Thomas ‘Without Love’ is such a soul stirring and uplifting version as Mr. John Cowan adds his superb voice in a vocal duet that takes us out of the dark and shows us the true light that shines for and in us all.

Brad Vickers & His Vestapolitans: Traveling Fool (ManHatTone)
http://www.myspace.com/vestapolitans
With his third release, Brad and his Vestapolitans take us back to the days when the road was king, music simpler and made for joy, and rock and roll was young and fresh. From the first notes of the title cut ‘Traveling Fool’, you are drawn in and made a comfortable partner, riding shotgun in this musical excursion. The Vestapolitans are named after the open Vestapol tuning, and they show that there are legions of super sounds available in open tunings that you just cannot achieve in regular tuning. Brad features a very special guest in the person of  Bobby Radcliff a guitar player who is so tough that it has been said he should carry, and pass out meat tenderizer with him at gigs. Mr. Radcliff add some very tasty and tender licks in his appearances on this release. Another guest is Mr. V.D. King on guitar who adds an uncanny knack for capturing era-sensitive and kick ass licks to two songs here. Brad offers an up-tempo version of the Sonny Terry classic, ‘Diggin’ My Potatoes’, which is a rollicking jaunt through the back roads complete with feet swinging to the beat while trying to maintain vertical on the running boards.

What Mr. Vickers and his band offer us is fun. Yes, a good time mix of eleven originals and four interpretations that span blues, ragtime, rock & roll and American roots music, materfully produced b whiz-kid Dave Gross. Each cut is strong, and are different enough to show you the versatility of this fine band. ‘Uh-Oh’, an original by Mr. Vickers, had my darling bride doing the frug, swim and looking for her go-go boots. What might very well be my adopted song for South Carolina (where I split my time) is by Ms. Margey Peters called ‘Skeeter Song’. A fine blend of saxophone punctuations, and rolling piano is a segue to an killer acoustic solo by Mr. Radcliff, all building to a fun ending that makes it right for all (‘cept the skeeter).

Two fine interpretations are the J.B. Lenoir ‘Low Down Dirty Shame’, and the classic Leroy Carr ‘How Long Blues’ take us to the final cut “Rockabilly Rumble’ which harkens back to the days when the saxophone was yielding to the electric guitar as the king of instruments.

In his liner notes Brad thanks Rosco Gordon, Pinetop Perkins, Jimmy Rogers, and others who Mr. Vickers has played with over the years, and he has learned so well from them, in this release he expresses and demonstrates a deep understanding of music and styles and they would be damn proud of this release.

Tas Cru: Jus’ Desserts (Crustee Tees Records)
http://www.tascru.com
Dubbed the ‘master of the triple entendre’, Mr. Cru offers life lessons to us with a certain flair that resonates deep. His ‘triple threat’ skills at songwriting, guitar playing and soulfull singing make him one of upstate New York’s jewels.
With his latest release Tas serves up a piping hot, eleven course meal of original songs for those of us who enjoy our blues with a literate twist. Opening with a nice down homey groove ‘Just Let It Happen‘ which extolls the virtues of learning to ‘just lettin’ things be’. This is so true. To reinforce this thought he offers us some tasty acoustic slide guitar by Jeremy Walz, that will get the point to you if you haven’t gotten it already.

Glad To Be Alive‘, is a nice jazz-tinged shuffle in which extolls the virtues of his baby and how she makes him so glad to be alive. This is a nice cut as it is electric and I am more accustomed to Mr. Cru’s acoustic work. A nice helping of straight up blues work is mixed in the cut ‘Eau De ‘Nother Man‘ which is a story about fragrances or scents that we all carry with us, and tell-tale other scents that can give ones transgressions away. This is prime Tas Cru writing, slick, funny, but spot on. All the Tas tunes are tasty but I have special fondness for ‘My GPS Mama’, and title track ‘Jus’ Desserts’ where Tas demonstrates his under-rated skills at harp playing. Mr. Cru is more than a funny singer-songwriter, true he does use humor and wit in his songwriting, but the message and depth of his music is more than strong enough to stand up to close examination. Jus’ Desserts offers us a toe tapping, laid back, thoroughly enjoyable release that will keep you coming back for more. Do check him and his releases out.

We are coming up fast on the Blues Music Awards in Memphis, May 5th, so that will involve travel and a gathering of the tribes for the week. Looking forward to seeing everyone and spending some quality time hanging out, catching up and listening/seeing some of the very best Blues artists. To see more about the Blues Music Awards you can visit this link http://www.blues.org/#ref=bluesmusicawards_index and while you are there consider joining the Blues Foundation – read about all the good they do for the musician’s, the Blues in Schools, the H(andy) A(rtist) R(elief) F(und) and so much more. You can join for as little as $25 USD, and youths
(14-20) can join for free.

Until next time,

Love, Peace & Chicken Grease,
chefjimi

photos: courtesy of Artists
©Blues411.com 2011